The Tale of Lara Dorren

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The Tale of Lara Dorren

The story of Lara Dorren was told by humans and elves alike. The renditions, however, varied wildly.

as told by humans[edit | edit source]

This version is mentioned in the original game, under the title The Story of Lara Dorren and Cragen of Lod.

The queen replied: 'Ask not me for mercy, but those whom you wronged with your magic. You had the courage to commit those deeds, now have courage when your pursuers and justice are close at hand. It is not in my power to pardon your sins.' Then the witch hissed like a cat and her sinister eyes flashed. 'My end is nigh,' she shrieked, 'but yours is too, O Queen. You shall remember Lara Dorren and her curse in the hour of your dreadful death. And know this: my curse will hound your descendants unto the tenth generation.' Seeing, however, that a doughty heart was beating in the queen's breast, the evil elven witch ceased to malign her, or to try to frighten her with the curse, but began instead to whine for help and mercy like a bitch dog...
— pg(s). 235, Baptism of Fire (UK edition)


as told by the elves[edit | edit source]

This version is mentioned in the original game, under the title Lara's Gift.

...but her begging softened not the stony hearts of the Dh'oine, the merciless, cruel humans. So when Lara, now not begging for mercy for herself, but for her unborn child, caught hold of the carriage door, on the order of the queen the thuggish executioner struck with a sword and hacked off her fingers. And when a severe frost descended in the night, Lara breathed her last on the forested hilltop, giving birth to a tiny daughter, whom she protected with the remains of the warmth still flickering in her. And though she was surrounded by the blizzard, the night and the winter, spring suddenly bloomed on the hilltop and feainnewedd flowers blossomed. Even today do those flowers bloom in only two places: in Dol Blathanna and on the hilltop where Lara Dorren aep Shiadhal perished.
— pg(s). 235, Baptism of Fire (UK edition)