Letter from an alchemist

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Letter from an alchemist
Tw3 scroll8.png
Contains useful information
Description
Inventory/slot
Books
Category
Common item
Type
Book
Source
Kaer Dhu
Base price
crown(s)
Price to sell
1 crown(s)
Weight
0 weight

This letter is found along with a key inside Kaer Dhu, the ruins across the lake, east of Fornhala, guarded by a nekker warrior.

Journal entry[edit | edit source]

Dearest Sir Robert de Mere,
Thank you for sending a bill of exchange in advance, and for your understanding – if I gave out advice for free, I'd very quickly run myself out of business.
You wrote that your son went missing while on a voyage – and that near the place where he was last seen there now lurks a nekker who wears a tattered shirt with your son's monogram sewed on it. You asked if it is possible that this nekker was your son, transformed by some spell.
After consulting the relevant literature, it pains me to inform you that your hypothesis is highly improbable, and there exists a much simpler and more likely explanation. Contrary to popular belief, nekkers are a sapient species. Like forest trolls, they will at times decorate themselves with pigment or scraps of human garments. One can with some confidence surmise that this nekker killed your son, tore up his shirt, and then put on it or some framgment thereof.
While that is most likely the case, one cannot be certain. Though I have not heard of any curse capable of turning a man into a nekker, I cannot rule out the possibility of its existence. In order to find out if the above-mentioned nekker truly is a creature born of a curse, the tattered shirt it wears must be taken from it, cut into shreds and burned. The shirt's ashes can then be mixed with dimeritium dust. If the resulting substance changes color, it will confirm your hypothesis.
If the experiment I described returns a positive result, please write me. I would gladly undertake further examinations meant to find a way to life this curse – for additional payment, of course.
Greetings,
Klaus Kellerman, Magister Artibus Oxoniensis